Monthly Archives: April 2014

Wednesday April 2, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

This comes from a remark Aaron’s grade two teacher made: “Kids always know their friends are coming back if their coats are still on the hallway hanger.” One of the children had been ill, but the class was sure he’d be back — simply because something of his was still there for them to see. I thought this was a significant observation!

Saturday April 5, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

I went to a bar with one of the women from the workshop, to celebrate our new friendship and to mourn the end of a wonderful event. We were in our 30s, and guys at another table made suggestive comments and lewd gestures the whole time we were there. I remember thinking, “I make smart-*** comments for a living, but I can’t think of one clever put-down to fling at these Neanderthals.” It was frustrating!!!

Monday April 7, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

I confess; when I went on business trips to cities where relatives were accessible, I would often “forget” to tell them I’d be there. I had so little time — most of which was taken up with meetings, interviews and book signings. I had little time to adjust before packing up and moving on. Sometimes folks were offended, but my philosophy was: If you can’t have a really good visit, then don’t visit at all! Later on, I made up for these fast take-offs and landings.

Friday April 11, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

I went away on business several times a year. The most exhausting trips were the book tours. Authors, at the time, were routinely sent from city to city to do as much publicity as possible. At first it’s exciting and rewarding — and dangerously ego boosting as well. By the end of the tour I was tired of talking, tired of signing, and just tired of ME! Still, I was a ham — eager to please, and by the time the next book was due, I would be looking forward to the next tour.

Sunday April 13, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

This is another gift from the horse’s mouth. Any time I got my husband into a clothing store, it was a special occasion. He hated to think about his attire. As long as he was comfortable, he didn’t much care about his image! He’d buy a year’s worth of clothing in one shot. The salesman would make sure that ties went with shirts, socks matched trousers, and that everything fit accordingly. Dressing him for a special occasion was much easier when there was a plan of attack. Still there were lapses, and this exact exchange took place before a dinner we had to attend.

Saturday April 19, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

A question like this would have made my parents get out the encyclopedia and look up the answer. My mother especially enjoyed teaching us stuff about plants and animals and would easily pick up a snake or a spider to show us it was something to admire. She was responsible I’m sure for my brother’s degree in biology and my years working as a medical artist!

Sunday April 20, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

Mrs. Baird was a background character who was meant to be put aside once Farley came into the family (her hobby was breeding Old English sheepdogs). To tie in with this, I also did a few strips about her being a friendly neighbour. I guess her short appearance struck a chord with some readers who asked to see her more often. In this Sunday page, I have her working in her greenhouse and talking to Michael — in a way that enabled me to say more about her personality and her past.

If Mrs. Baird was based on anyone at all, it would have been the ladies who lived across the street from us when I was growing up in North Vancouver. They were sisters, the “Miss Stewarts.” They taught kindergarten and piano and were endlessly patient with me. I made a habit of going to their home uninvited and was rarely told that they had no time. When I needed an extra hug or another grown-up opinion, I headed for the Miss Stewarts’ house and twisted the ringer on the front door to be let in.

Not long ago, I was in North Vancouver and I went for a nostalgic walk down Fifth Street. Their old wood frame house is still there, though mine is now a condo complex. A notice was on their fence to say the house and the one next door would soon be condos as well. I’m glad I got to see it one more time. There have been many unforgettable folks in my life, and these two ladies are certainly among them!

Sunday April 27, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

I got my first real burn from my curling iron. I was in a hurry; it flew out of my hand, and stupidly, I tried to catch it. I had to wear a bandage on my hand for two weeks. The pain and the inconvenience made me aware of how dangerous these things can be, so when my kids were around, I was extra careful with it. I made sure they knew it could be dangerous, that it was not a toy and should never be played with. I was certain that my lecture was well heeded until the day I noticed my curling iron had been put away “differently.” When I examined it, I saw nylon and some other substance melted to the barrel. I never found out what my kids had been doing with it or what they had destroyed, which reminds me: Now that they are adults, they tell me stories of “what really happened” when I wasn’t looking — I’ll have to ask about the curling iron!!

Monday April 28, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

The library where Elly volunteered was based on the library in Dundas, Ontario, where I went with Aaron to borrow toys and books and to take in the free events put on for kids. There were readings, films, children’s shows, and an annual yard sale — the profits from which went to buy the toys we all borrowed and appreciated so much. That library was a resource and a refuge, and even though these images were sparse in detail, I felt I was “there” when I drew them!

Tuesday April 29, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

My folks taught us to appreciate money. Anything over and above the weekly allowance had to be earned. There were always small chores assigned — easy enough to be completed, yet significant enough to be helpful. We were genuinely pleased with ourselves for finishing a job and excited about the payment afterwards. The next lesson was to make sure the money was well spent. With the corner store a short bike-ride away, that part of the lesson took a bit longer to sink in.