Monthly Archives: November 2014

Sunday November 2, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

After Halloween, Katie would save up her goodies until Aaron went dry. Unlike her older sibling, she could restrain herself from eating all of her stash at once — which surprised me. Of the two children, she had the sweetest tooth. We even called her "Cake" instead of "Kate" because she liked desserts so much. At the end of October, however, willpower set in. She could hoard her gains in full view, then savour each morsel after Aaron’s was long gone. I remember watching him as he pretended not to be fazed by the sounds of crinkling wrappers followed by lip smacking and the sound of "mmmmmm." I was surprised that he didn’t pounce on her or ask me for a treat to make up for the discrepancy. He just put up with the injustice, and I wondered when and how he’d get even, because this would come about, guaranteed. Like my brother and me, my kids were creative teases!

Monday November 3, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

The malapropisms kids use while learning the language are so much fun. Words like "awfuls" for "waffles" and "Anointed Stakes of America" made me laugh out loud. My mother told me she once wrote an essay on the copulation of Canada and how it grew bigger after the first world war. I never thought I’d get away with using that one, but I did.

Tuesday November 4, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

The strips I did on skating and hockey moms always struck a chord. Parents who spend a good part of their time sitting on hard benches in cold arenas while their offspring scramble over the ice should be given their own special place in heaven. It will be warm, have comfortable seating and the coffee will not taste like socks.

Friday November 7, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

In North Bay, we had access to some great sports facilities, so the kids were soon skating, swimming, and playing hockey. My car was on the road constantly — ferrying them to the rink or the "Y," or wherever the game was to be, and I had a rule: four trips only. I would only drive into town four times in a day. This was met with some confusion, as I had counted each way, there and back, as separate trips! The rule was then changed to eight trips. AAAUGH!

Sunday November 9, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

Our house in Corbeil was hidden in quite a dense forest, so leaves and clippings could easily be tossed into the woods or piled somewhere for compost. Our house in Dundas, though (on which the Pattersons’ house was based), was in a busy, upscale neighbourhood, where leaves had to be piled, pushed into bags, and left for city workers to remove. After a discussion about the waste we made with plastic bags, I decided to take a load of leaves to the dump myself, but in the back of the car, bagless. I only did this once. It was a nuisance, a mess, and created a lot of work!

Monday November 10, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

Every now and then I could work in a "public service announcement" thanks to our in-house dentist. Grinding your teeth at night is something many of us do without being aware of it. You can even crack a filling with the strength of your jaw. A "bite splint" will help to relax your jaws at night and keep you from having that awful head-achy feeling in the morning. Sadly, it can’t help to solve the problems that make you grind your teeth in the first place!

Tuesday November 18, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

My dad always had beautiful window displays in his jewellery shop. The front windows were small, so we could really go to town — especially at Christmas. We couldn’t afford new things, so we made do with wedding dresses from the Salvation Army for the snow, last year’s Christmas cards for sparkles, and tinsel from our own tree. Mom found and painted tiny branches. She cut elaborate snowflakes from tissue paper saved from gifts and shoe boxes — and I have to say those windows were spectacular. Eaton’s and the Hudson Bay stores in Vancouver had nothing on us. Folks would bring their kids by dad’s shop windows just to see what we’d done that year, and if we were lucky, they’d come in and buy a gift or two. Interestingly, that wasn’t the goal. We all loved the challenge of making that display the best it could possibly be.

Wednesday November 19, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

I was a member of the Art Centre board in North Bay for a few years. In an effort to make the theatre more profitable, a friend and I drove to a neighbouring town’s theatre to find out how they managed to stay in the black. Thinking they had a magical formula, I begged them to tell us the secret to their financial success. The answer, sadly, was Bingo. Bingo became one of our main resources, too. You’d think the wonderful art of live theatre would have brought in enough to pay the bills!

Saturday November 22, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

One of the reasons I don’t volunteer to be a board member now is that I always have suggestions. My philosophy is — if you make a suggestion, you should be willing to act on it! With this in mind, I graciously decline opportunities to be a board member. Even at the age of 65, I still can’t keep my mouth shut!

Sunday November 23, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

Once again…a true-to-life bit of stupidity became a Sunday strip. It was one of those things that made me say to myself, "What was I thinking? I KNEW that would happen!" Because these events made such good material, I was almost HAPPY to have done something silly! When I could use a situation, make fun of it, exaggerate it, draw all of the expressions, delve into the body language…I was grateful! Knowing this, my kids would try to diminish a situation by saying, "Hey, you can use that in the strip!" Using the strip as an outlet was convenient. I didn’t need a therapist; I just poured my thoughts into the ether and waited for the results to come back. Always, there was someone out there who felt the same way I did, someone had had the same experience exactly and could identify. Their letters were wonderful. There’s nothing more comforting than knowing you’re not alone!

Sunday November 30, 2014

Lynn’s Notes:

This was one of my father’s "tricks of the trade." He had many ways to make tears disappear. He had stories and sayings and jokes and songs. He made faces, he danced and clowned — we had our own private vaudeville show complete with costumes, music, mime, and verse. He could be silly. He could delve into fantasy as easily as we could, and he saw things through our eyes, something few grown-ups have the imagination to do. Dad was like another kid who sometimes sided with us — against Mom. I remember her telling us and Dad to, "Please…GROW UP!!!"